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Tour Blog Part 27 : Park West, Chicago, Illinois

Park West

The venue Park West is nicely laid out. The dressing room is not very large, but the backstage bathroom and shower were good (best tiling of any on the tour so far!). We set up on what is a wide but shallow stage with access only on the side that I am not on. The previous gig at the Cleveland House of Blues had a very deep stage and good access at both sides. Much easier for getting on and off for the songs I do not play on. The shallow stage in Chicago meant the audience felt very close to the band. We could see the whites of their eyes and I certainly felt more visible too. 

Oh yes. One thing I forgot to say about the Cleveland gig was that I found a room backstage to do some clarinet practice. As a woodwind player, particularly a reeds player, one really does need to practice to keep one's sound, embouchure, and general technique. I am much less of a clarinet player than a sax and flute player, so it was very useful to do some practice. The benefit of the practice was very noticeable to me on both the Cleveland and Chicago shows. I wish I could do it every day when on tour, but the facilities generally are just not there. I am sure it would be very annoying to the other guys in the band if in a small dressing room I was practising my scales up and down and squeaking away on those high notes when they were trying to chill out. 

The Chicago gig was apparently gig number 75 that this band has done since starting in October 2011. That is a lot! We toured Oct/Nov 2011, April/May 2012, and now. Steven, Nick, Adam and I have done every gig. Marco didn't do the couple Chad Wackerman did (and Chad is coming back soon) and there have been four guitarists, so Guthrie is the new boy. I remember well the gig we did at Chicago Park West on 18 Nov 2011, as it was the last gig we did with the guitarist John Wesley and the final gig on that first tour. Also, after the gig Steven's manager Andy Leff sat each member of the band down in the venue and told us how much Steven had loved that tour and playing with the band and how he wanted to continue with it and do more - and were we interested? Until then it had really just been an experiment to see how it all went. So here we are 18 months later with the new album which we recorded together in Los Angeles doing very well and the band going from strength to strength. 

The Chicago gig went down a storm and the audience was excellent. We did the song 'Sectarian' tonight but instead of the gauze at the front of the stage dropping in the middle of the song, it was decided to drop it after the end of the song. This was because with the curved shape of the front of the stage and the way the gauze was hung, it was thought that when it fell it might land on Steven, Guthrie and Nick's heads, and it might turn into an unplanned comedy moment. It would have looked ridiculous if Steven was walking around onstage with a white sheet on his head! When the gauze did come down, this did not infact happen, but it could have, so it was probably a wise precaution. 

After the encore, I went out to meet and greet fans again and sign autographs. Nice to meet the good people of Chicago and beyond and talk to some very appreciative fans who had clearly loved the show. 

Back onto the bus for another Jeremy Brett episode of Sherlock Holmes (the Solitary Cyclist) on DVD and then to bed. Next stop Minneapolis, home of the legendary artist known as Prince. Tried to check out some of his stuff on Youtube, but there is actually not so much there. Apparently he has his lawyers take down as many unauthorised clips as they can. Some random Prince information - In 2001 he became a Jehovah's Witness and he still sometimes knocks on people's doors to discuss his faith. He is a vegetarian and in 2006 was voted 'Worlds sexiest vegetarian'. His releases have sold over 80 million copies and he has won 7 Grammys. He was called 'Skipper' when he was a little boy. 

I went for a short walk to grab a coffee, and saw two strange things: a 'Pedal Pub', which is a bike for 10 people with a bar; and the Target Centre (or Center) which is a big arena for basketball and concerts and on the entrances are signs 'No guns are allowed on the premises'. Welcome to America.

Pedal Pub
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Tour Blog Part 26 : House of Blues, Cleveland, Ohio

The House of Blues

The venue was the Cleveland 'House of Blues'. This is a chain and on previous US tours with Steven we played a few of these - LA, Dallas and Orlando come to mind. Many years ago I played at the one in Harvard Square, Boston with the band Gong, and I remember seeing Dan Aykroyd there chatting to someone. I think that was actually the original one and he started the chain with John Belushi and others. These venues are nicely laid out and the facilities are usually pretty good. This one was no exception. 

So the Soundcheck-After-Day-Off (SADO?) was again a good one. After the usual checks of the system, equipment and monitors, we launched into an instrumental jam that was pretty happening. Definitely musically a notch up from previous ones. Mainly open improvs with grooves and there was one piece that referenced Miles' track Tutu. Adam was of course on that original album. There was an electric Miles vibe to some other parts, and overall some good music was made, methinks. Much fun too. 

The gig was not till 9pm so there was a long gap after the soundcheck. We ordered dinner to be delivered backstage and I ordered a Buttermilk Grilled Chicken which was so ridiculously large I barely managed to eat half of it before feeling totally stuffed. Marco has a USB memory stick full of Hitchcock movies, so I took the opportunity to watch on the bus 'Frenzy' which I had not seen. It is a classic Hitchcock film from 1972 and very much a London film, made largely around Covent Garden when it was still a fruit and veg market. It was Hitchcock's first film back in London after having filmed many in America and great to see Covent Garden and central London as it was in 1972. Interestingly, the directors own father had worked in that market and Hitchcock wanted to capture film of the market as a working fruit and veg market before that was all transferred elsewhere, which happened in 1974. It is about a serial killer and is a thriller. A great film - I enjoyed it very much.

The gig itself was good. A very enthusiastic audience verging on rowdy at times, and in fact Steven did say at one point "Are you listening to me?" as a few members of the audience seemed to be going over the top. However when Steven asked for quiet for the opening section of the song 'Raider 2' which has long quiet pauses in, the audience was completely silent. I was impressed. We played the slightly different set to the night before as there were fans that were attending both shows. Afterwards a few of us went out to the merch' table to autograph CDs etc and shake some hands.

Then onto the bus for the overnight drive to Chicago. The bus has two lounges both with TV and DVD players, a bathroom, small kitchen with sink, fridge, freezer, microwave and kettle, lots of storage and also comfy seats/sofas and twelve bunks which are not huge but comfortable. Each bunk has a curtain for privacy. I sleep fine on the bus and it makes complete sense to tour like this, doing the big drives while we sleep. I took a couple of photos to let you have a peek into our private bus world.

We rolled into a rainy Chicago this morning for our first time zone change of the tour. Clocks one hour back. The venue is Park West and is another good one. Should be fun tonight.

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Tour Blog Part 25 : Mr. Small's Funhouse, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia

Mr. Small's Funhouse, Pittsburgh

Day off. Hurrah. After a relaxing day of rest, emails, a shower and general catching up on stuff, I wanted to go out to get something to eat. There had been some emails going around mid afternoon suggesting going out for a meal, but these seemed to stop around 5 pm. I assumed either my email was not working or people had gone off separately and I was not invited. So I leave my room around 7.30pm to wander off all by my lonesome..., and then I bump into Nick in the lift. Turns out he is going to get something to eat on his own. So we wander out together. Great. We find a cafe that looks nice and take a look inside. Hey - there is Harv and Adrian. We ask if they want to eat and Harv does so comes along with us. We find a cool bar that does pizzas and light bites and go in and sit by the window and order. Five minutes later there are 3 more of the guys and some friends standing outside the window on their way to dinner. Adam leaves them and joins our growing party. So it is quite a gathering now. We are sitting at our table by the window and ten minutes later, there is Steven outside wandering down the street on his own. We wave him in pleased to see him. "Hey guys, no one invited me out to dinner! " he says. So I explain that no one asked anyone, and by chance we all met up and he joins us and a good time was had by all.

 I chose the local speciality pizza which was with spicy chicken and peppers and with French fries actually on the pizza. Then we shared some pieces of deep fried cheesecake. I know, it all sounds a bit Glasgow, but it tasted pretty good actually. 

The next day the van picked us up to take us to the venue, Mr Small's which is a converted church. On the way to the venue we saw another converted church, that one converted to a brewery. I have not seen that before. Drink of the devil indeed... 

There was some free time before the soundcheck so a few of us went to an amazing nearby record store called Attic Records. Wow. It was huge and had thousands of vinyl albums, and some really obscure CDs and records and multiple copies of rare records. The helpful proprietor explained there was even more stock in a separate building. I don't think I can ever remember seeing more vinyl in a record store. I was particularly interested in seeing some rare jazz flute albums, but didn't buy anything as I would have to carry it round South America and my baggage weight allowance is already up to the max. 

The gig itself was good. We dropped 'No part of me' and brought back 'Sectarian' which worked well. Sectarian is played mainly behind the gauze and amusingly Steven larked about a bit during it. I think it is great that even though he has so much on his shoulders with the concerts and the organisation of the tour and he is so focused and acutely aware of everything going on onstage, he can still relax and have a bit of a laugh during the gig. 

Before playing 'Harmonie Korine' Steven asked the audience who had seen the extraordinary new film 'Springbreakers' as it was directed by him and is his first mainstream movie. He mentioned the scene in which a Britney Spears song is sung by the James Franco character, and it reminded me of the incredible cover of a Britney Spears song that my friend Andy Tillison introduced me to. It is by the Swedish trio 'Dirty Loops' and I think it is stunning how they have transformed what for me is a very produced computer assembled sounding track that is lifeless and dull, into a fantastic song that totally comes alive when played by this killing young band. It sounds like they are having a ball too. It has to be one of the best cover versions I have heard and in my humble opinion wipes the floor with the original. See what you think. 

At the beginning of the encore we tried an alternative version of 'Luminol' inspired by the band The Shaggs. I am not sure how that went down, but it was fun to do and unusual...Then we played 'Remainder the black dog' and 'No Twilight'. Again I went out to the merchandise table after the gig for photos and to sign autographs as did some of the others. We left for Cleveland after the gig, and at 4 am I got up to go to the bathroom on the bus, and I bumped into Marco, who said the three magic words 'Rooms are ready'. We had actually reached the hotel in Cleveland by 4 am and could check in to our rooms already. Splendid.
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Tour Blog Part 24 : Upstate Concert Hall, Albany, New York

​After another night drive we arrived in Albany, New York for the triple bill with Opeth and Katatonia. I rolled out of the tour bus and into the venue and bumped into Opeth's leader, guitarist and frontman Mikael Akerfeldt. We had not met before but we knew who each other were. Mikael immediately said how much he loves Stevens album 'the Raven that refused to sing', and we both said how much we were looking forward to hearing each other's band live. Seems like a nice guy. 

After much hanging around, we sound checked at about 4pm. We ran the usual couple of songs to check everything was working and for Ian, our front of house sound engineer to fine tune the sound. We take our own mixing desk and cables and microphones on the road with us, but not stage monitors (for those who do not use in ear monitors) or PA system. So everything needs checking but Ian and the crew are extremely good and it is all done quickly and efficiently. 

One thing I have been enjoying recently onstage is the small spinning conch shaped gong that Marco bought in Amsterdam off my friend Steve Hubback which he has incorporated into his drum kit. It has a beautiful and enchanting sound and when it is struck it spins around as does the sound it makes. Marco usually strikes it at certain particular points in the show like at the end of the song 'Index' and the sound always shines through. It always makes me smile. 

The first band on was Katatonia who are a Swedish metal band. I only heard a bit of their set which sounded OK but not particularly for me. We then went onstage at 8 pm. The crowd was packed into the space and there were a lot of people there. With a low ceiling and a packed club you might expect it to be very hot and sweaty onstage, but the air conditioning was so powerful I was actually cold onstage as gusts of Arctic-like wind blew down on my head. It felt rather strange. Our set was shorter than normal because of the triple bill, so we had to lose a few songs. It all went well though and we got a great response. 

After a quick changeover, Opeth came onstage. I have not head their music before, but have been aware of them for years as Steven has produced some of their albums, is a good friend of Mikael and also collaborated with him on the 'Storm Corrosion' project. Their set was very varied and included some very heavy songs with what is called 'death growl' vocals, which sounds to you and me like the Cookie Monster from the Muppets. Actually I have never experienced this live before and it was not as silly sounding as I expected. Some heavy metal has high pitched screaming and that can sound even more ridiculous. The death growling was only on the heaviest of songs and it does kind of work with the music. The following day I even checked out the 'How to death growl' videos on Youtube out of curiosity. Looks like you make a sort of clearing your throat sound, and then speak or sing as low as possible and loud. Hmm...Then there was a track called 'Atonement' which was introduced as their psychedelic song and I thought it did have a '60s psychedelia vibe to it. Then some strong acoustic guitar songs which were still dark and ominous sounding and also a beautiful song from their recent Heritage album. So a huge range and because of that, everything made everything else sound more dramatic and interesting. There was also space in the music and everything was very well played. I saw just about the whole set and was impressed and enjoyed it. 

A friend of Steven's who was hanging out backstage said she was from New Jersey and when I said I had spent some time there and has been to Point Pleasant Beach she told me of the devastation there and along the coast at Seaside Heights from Hurricane Sandy. I remember that beach well and was shocked to see some photos of the destruction caused. 

I had an early- ish night and awoke in Pittsburgh in the rain where we are having a day off in a hotel. Yeah! Random piece of band information for the day...most quoted film this week - 'Withnail and I'.

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Tour Blog Part 23 : New York - Boston

Best Buy Theatre

Before the New York gig I met up with Leonardo Pavkovic of MoonJune records and manager of Soft Machine Legacy . He brought me some copies of our new album 'Burden of Proof' which I had not seen yet and wanted to have for myself and also to sell on this tour. The music is kind of ' psychedelic free improv' bluesy progressive jazz', so should be of interest to some fans of Steven's band. We went out for coffee and some proper New York cheesecake which was good but pretty rich! Good to catch up on news too. 

The gig itself went well. A big crowd which was actually about 50% bigger than last time. The audience was enthusiastic and speaking to people later they all said they really enjoyed it, but compared to the Montreal audience they were notably quieter. There were some loud heckles too and we even had to restart one song. Adam had lots of friends, family and students at the show and he played particularly well I thought. Afterwards, I saw my friend the singer songwriter and jazz bass player John Lester who moved to New York not long ago, and is about to move back to San Francisco. He made a jazz quartet album in London called 'Jazz?' recently that I featured on with great jazz arrangements of rock songs by artists like the Cure, Tori Amos, the Police, Crowded House and others. 

After the show I started to feel a sore throat coming on. The following morning when I woke up in Boston I felt a bit rough and it did not improve much during the day. I was supposed to meet some good friends for dinner but cancelled as I just needed to chill out and try and feel better for the gig. I did meet up with my sister in law and her children in the afternoon for coffee and that was really nice. She said they live 3 minutes from where the Boston bombers lived and the kids go to school in Watertown, Boston where the bombs went off. Fortunately they are all fine though. 

Sometimes when you feel a bit rough on tour and there is no hotel so you just have to hang around backstage or on the tour bus it can be a bit of a drag. I later heard that Marco did not feel so good during the day either. However when we walked onstage at 8pm, I felt OK. The gig was at the Berklee Performance Centre, which is the concert hall at the Berklee College of music. It is world famous for its jazz course and there are a lot of famous jazz musicians who have attended the college like Branford Marsalis, Keith Jarrett and Gary Burton. Some well known rock musicians too like Mike Portnoy and Steve Vai. So we were very aware that there were going to be lots of musicians in the audience and indeed there were. Maybe it was the contrast with the rest of the day, but for whatever reason it felt fantastic walking onstage. The fun we had been having on the soundcheck on 'Luminol' seemed to be creeping into the gig version, and it sounded totally on fire to me. The audience was really stoked and very enthusiastic. The show itself went very well I thought and for the first part of the encore we did something very unusual and a bit crazy but both amusing and actually pretty musical in a very off the wall way. I won't say any more...Then we played the more usual encore medley of 'Remainder the black dog' into 'No Twilight'. 

Afterwards I went out to sign CDs and programmes etc with Nick and we met and chatted with some fans. One guy had flown all the way from Australia for the gig! 

Tomorrow Albany, New York for a triple bill with Opeth (who I have not seen or heard before but heard lots about) and Katatonia. Apparently Albany is the capital of New York State, not New York City. Seems odd, but maybe it is a way to share out things bit. It will be interesting to see how it works having three bands all setting up, soundchecking and performing on the same bill. Could be interesting (or chaos!).

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Tour Blog Part 22 : Montreal, Quebec, Canada

The Club Soda, Montreal
Theo on Soprano Sax

So on gig day we arrived at the venue about 2.30 pm. I set up my instruments, then met up with the great music writer John Kelman and his friend and a few of us went out for coffee, cake and chat which was nice. We came back for the soundcheck and played through 'Luminol' first. There is something that happens when we play that song on the soundcheck after a day off, particularly during the keyboard solo section near the beginning. We all go a bit crazy, let off steam and play with a really powerful energy just enjoying being back on the stage and playing again with this wonderful group of musicians. 

In the dressing room, Steven mentioned that the new album has now sold 8000 copies on vinyl alone. This is obviously a small fraction of total sales, but it is lot of vinyl copies, and would have been unthinkable 15 years ago. Interesting just how much there is a resurgence of interest in vinyl. The gig itself was amazing. The audience was ridiculous (good ridiculous!). We walked onstage to a deafening roar which kept going for quite a while. I looked out and saw half the front row all were wearing black 'Raven' T-shirts. The enthusiasm continued throughout the gig. It was nice to get some applause after my sax solo in the song 'Pindrop'. At the end of the gig after the encore, the audience was so enthusiastic Steven decided to go back on for a second encore. We have not done this before and it was not planned. I think it took the crew by surprise, but with an audience response like that we had to do something. After it was all over I went out to the merchandise stand to sign autographs and where I sold over double the number of copies of my CD 'Follow' than on any other gig to date. Good to meet some fans and Facebook 'friends' too. 

After the gig we headed off back to America. It was going to take an hour to reach the border crossing, so we watched one of the Jeremy Brett episodes of Sherlock Holmes that Adam had brought on DVD called The Dancing Men. Most enjoyable. We reached the border at about 2.45 am and it took an hour to get through everything, so I finally got to bed at 3.45am exhausted. 

I woke up whilst the tour bus was driving into New York. There is something very exciting about driving into Manhattan on a tour bus on the way to a gig there. I remember well driving into New York in 2000 with the band Gong on a converted Greyhound bus listening to a great McCoy Tyner CD 'Infinity' on the way to our gig at the hip venue/club called the Knitting Factory (now no more). As a British jazz musician, gigging in New York is always going to feel really special. We drove through the Bronx and Harlem and down Broadway towards Times Square where we are playing tonight at the Best Buy Theatre.

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Tour Blog Part 21 : Toronto, Ontario

The Phoenix, Toronto

So the day off in Toronto was relaxing and much needed. I felt pretty exhausted by the time I settled into my hotel room. Later on I went for a walk up the Main Street. - Yonge Street. I passed Massey Hall, venue of one of saxophonist Charlie Parker's legendary concerts and recordings and I think various classic live albums. Soaked up a bit of the Toronto vibe and ate a Johnny Rocket's burger and sweet potato fries which were just what the doctor ordered. 

The next day got to the venue, the Phoenix, early. Outside I noticed a black squirrel. Jet black. I have never seen one like that before, but Guthrie told me they were common in some places and are doing to the grey squirrels what the grey squirrels did to the red ones. Marco later mentioned he had seen a family of giant racoons sitting by the load in door. One just stared him in the eye and carried on his business.

Backstage in the dressing room before the gig, DJ Wilson played some cool tracks. 'One of those days in England' from Bullinamingvase by Roy Harper was fabulous and I only half knew it. I know and love his albums 'Stormcock' and 'Flat, Baroque and Beserk' very well, and other individual songs, but not this one. Beautiful. Then Steven introduced Adam and me to some recent Marillion. I have not previously been much impressed by the music of theirs I have heard. However Steven played something from the new album and it did sound good. I was particularly impressed with Steve Hogarth's voice which sounded magnificent.

After the soundcheck Adam told me some more interesting things about Miles Davis' band, and in particular the sax players in the band who were around when he was. I was also fascinated to hear (Adam I hope you don't mind me sharing...), that having heard the album 'Metal Fatigue', Miles wanted Allan Holdsworth in his band, and asked Adam to call him and ask him to join the band. Adam did indeed make that call, and Allan said he was honoured to have been asked, but due to commitments could not do it. Now if he had joined, that would have been interesting to hear! 

The gig was good fun and the crowd loved it. The venue itself is a long narrow room, So the stage space was tight. In fact I was pretty hemmed in in my corner. Normally I walk offstage for the couple of songs I do not play on, but today I just stayed onstage, looking mean and moody! I wonder if people noticed I was there but did not play on entire songs. It was also hot onstage. Inspired by the enthusiasm and hopes of a fan who I heard was driving a long way to the gig and keen for autographs, I arranged for a few of us to go out and sign CDs and programmes after the show at a table by the merchandise stand. The said fan was most pleased and said they would cherish the signatures for ever! 

Overnight we drove to Montreal and when I got up the bus was on a street next to a 'Sexotheque'. I guess that is like a discotheque, but, um...different. There were also some drug addicts in the street, who did not look well at all. The tour bus stopped where the driver had been told to park by the venue manager. Some van delivery driver then came screaming at the driver saying he couldn't park there, and called the police. After more shenanigans we moved and got dropped off at the hotel, before the bus went and parked somewhere else.

It was a nice boutiquey hotel. The only curiosity was the big mirrors in the shower. As in right in the shower. Now why would you want that? 

Adrian Holmes, our excellent merchandise man, and fellow Brummie, had a spare free ticket to see Muse that evening so I said I was up for it. I have not been wild about what I have heard of their CDs, but footage of them live looked amazing so I thought it would be good to go and see the show. In the afternoon, I watched some recent live youtube clips of the band to check out some songs etc. The arena was big - maybe 8,000 people at a guess. The band were indeed stunning. A fantastic arena or stadium band as they completely fill the space and have an incredible light show. The most impressive I have ever seen (image below)

The music is very strong, a bit like Radiohead with an injection of Queen, and the frontman and lead singer, Matt Bellamy was extraordinary and very commanding. The band comes from Teignmouth, a beautiful small town in Devon, England that I know where I have played many times as they have a great jazz festival and regular jazz club too. They were all at school together there. You could probably fit the whole town in most of the venues the band plays at now! Very enjoyable gig and a good night out.

Muse in Toronto
The Steven Wilson team at The Phoenix, Toronto
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Tour Blog Part 20 : Buffalo, New York

Guthrie Govan
Theo at work

We arrived in Buffalo, NY mid morning. Buffalo is at the top of New York State, and only 5 mins from the Canadian border. The venue, called the Town Ballroom, was a revamped and refurbished old theatre originally called the Town Casino that had been a casino, restaurant/bar and venue. It had hosted John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jnr amongst others. Al Capone is known to have visited the place too. 

The Niagra Falls are only 20 mins away from the venue, so Marco and Nick went to visit them as they are indeed one of the seven wonders of the world (according to some versions of the list). I did not, as I usually just want to relax and take it easy before a gig. The photos they brought back looked quite amazing though. 

The gig had an intimate atmosphere and the front of the stage was a semi-circle, so at the sides the audience were closer to us than usual. The band played well and the audience were pumped and very vocal in their enthusiasm. Steven asked them to control themselves for the beginning of Raider 2, where there are long pauses between the opening sparse and quiet notes. Impressively, they did and there was complete audience silence for that section of the music. Clearly respect was being shown. I think Guthrie was probably the man of the match tonight. I am not sure if he played any better than normal, because to be honest his guitar playing is always spectacular. However, his solos got a particularly good response from the audience. I noticed there were some people standing right in front of him whose facial expressions seemed to follow every musical phrase he played. As he ratcheted up the intensity, so these fans got more and more excited until they looked like they were going to hyperventilate and possibly explode. Fortunately there were no such medical emergencies. In fact there was a lot of applause not just after everyone's solos, but even after phrases within solos. This crowd was really listening! We may be a long way from Manhattan but maybe there was still a bit of downtown New York in these guys. Very exciting. Overall I think it was another very good gig. 

Our dinner had been ordered long before the gig, but for some reason it didn't arrive until after we had gone onstage, so we had to eat it afterwards which was not ideal. Afterwards, I met some fans and signed some CDs which was fine except for some bloke who asked me if I was the bass player. When his friends told him I was the flute player, he then asked if I was the keyboard player. I said I played one track on the keyboard but mainly I played flute and sax, to which he responded, 'Yes, but are you the keyboard player ?' Sometimes I wonder.... 

So once we were all loaded up we left to cross the border to Canada as next gig is in Toronto. We reached the border about 1.45 am by which time about half the band were in their bunks sleeping. The lady border guard came onto bus to check all our passports. The tour manager explained to her that quite a few people were in bed, but maybe she could walk down the bus with the passports and people could poke their heads out of their bunks so she could check the faces against the passport photos. She said 'that sounds kind of creepy' and laughed, so everyone got up and presented themselves to her. After we were through, I went to sleep and woke up in Toronto for a day and night off and in a hotel before the gig day. Hurrah! Not so good was when in the hotel I heard that there had been a foiled major terrorist attack on a train in Toronto. Today. 

I took the time to listen again to the final mixes of the new album by the Tangent which I have played on. The Tangent is a progressive rock band from England led by the inimitable Andy Tillison, which I have played with since 2004. I say it is from England, but it has had an ever changing line up and often included members from Sweden. Andy is a prolific writer and producer and since 2004, I have played on 6 studio albums, 2 live DVDs, and various gigs in the UK, mainland Europe and very memorably the Rosfest festival in Philadelphia, USA in 2005 which was a blast. Anyway, the new album which is on Inside Out records is called 'Le Sacre du Travail' and musically references Stravinsky's 'The Rite of Spring' (Le Sacre du Printemps) in a clever and very musical way. The lyrics of the album, instead of being about the primitive rituals celebrating the advent of spring and a dance to the death of a sacrificial victim, are about the more mundane rituals of getting out of bed in the morning, getting in your car, going to work, sitting in the traffic, coming home and the tedious treadmill of the everyday life of the working person. One of the hallmarks of Andy's lyrics is the very down to earth nature of them. No hobbits and space travel, but songs referencing for example getting on the Number 11 bus, being lost in London, getting up for work, stealing clothes from C&A, listening to Radio 2, selling things on ebay etc. There is a stellar line up for this album of Gavin Harrison on drums (from Porcupine Tree), Jonas Reingold on bass (from the Flower Kings), Jakko Jakszyk on additional vocals and guitar delivering some excellent solos, Andy on keyboards, guitars and lead vocals, and me on blowy things. There are also some guest vocals by David Longdon of Big Big Train. I recorded my parts at Andy's studio in Yorkshire at the beginning of this year and had a lot of fun doing so. The final album has come out very well and Andy has integrated the rock band and the orchestral parts brilliantly. Apart from my flutes, clarinets and saxes, there are bassoons, oboes and some lower brass playing melodic and contrapuntal parts. These parts are integral to the whole and it is not a case of overlaying swathes of strings onto slow songs for extra texture. I am also very happy with how Andy incorporated my woodwind parts. So watch out for that one... 

The skype in the hotel was a bit rubbish which is very frustrating. Skype generally is such a godsend when you are on tour. Wherever you are in the world you can have a video call to home (or anywhere else) for either no cost or practically no cost. It is truly amazing and proof that some things in life just get better and better. But...frustrating when it does not work. 

Oh yes. Random interesting musical fact of the day. I read in Classic Rock Magazine on the tour bus that when David Bowie was in his glorious Ziggy Stardust phase, he was constantly fascinated by and inspired by the early Van Der Graaf Generator albums like 'H to He, Who am the Only One' and 'Pawn Hearts' . I thought this really interesting and if you have heard those albums or the unique voice of Peter Hamill it makes complete sense.

The Town Ballroom
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Tour Blog Part 19 : Washington D.C.

Theo & Steven

The venue was the Howard Theatre, which was an old place that had in fact been closed for about 40 years but opened again only a year ago and is really nice. Friendly helpful staff, and excellent catering. In fact after the gig one of the big beefy security guards who looked like Mike Tyson in a tight black suit shook my hand and said 'Great job'. That does not usually happen. 

In the morning I went for a coffee with Guthrie. Near the venue was a coffee shop that from the outside looked a bit bleak and rough. Like you would walk in and all sound would stop and people would turn round and stare at you. But we walked in and it was a great cafe, very vibey, excellent coffee and croissant, and cool music on the sound system. Perfect. 

Then back to the venue where I took a shower and caught up on emails etc. I tried Guthrie's TC Electronic 'Ditto' looping pedal. This enables you to play lines, record them and repeat them instantly, then add layers on top. It enables a solo line player (eg. someone with a flute) to create layers and tapestries of sound and play very differently to what you are limited to without such technological assistance. I have done a lot of such playing and recording with other footpedals eg. my solo alto flute album 'Slow Life', and all the performing and recording I have done with Robert Fripp, solo and with Steve Lawson. This new pedal is tiny, pretty intuitive and sonically clean. I was impressed and think it could be a useful addition. 

Dinner was a thoroughly delicious very tender brisket steak and collard greens which I have not had before. Sort of kale/ cabbage type vegetable which I understand is cooked for a long time with bits of turkey in. Then Apple Cobbler and ice cream. Ridiculous (good ridiculous!). We wandered around the dressing room feeling stuffed and joked about feeling so fat we would not be able to play and all the tempos having to be half speed... I did notice on the gig I was very thirsty and drank more water than any other gig we had done on this tour. It could have been because the food had been pretty salty. Maybe. 

The gig itself went very well. Not much to report, but it all felt good. After the gig and going out to sign some CDs and programmes, Adam noticed that in the club next door to our venue was a live band playing 'GoGo' music. Adam explained that GoGo is type of funk that originated in Washington D.C, made famous by Chuck Brown, and what we were hearing was the 'real deal'. We listened outside the fire exit to the band for a while and it did sound great. The easiest way to explain the GoGo rhythm is to point to either Chuck Brown or Grace Jones' 'Slave to the rhythm', on which she used that rhythm borrowing some of the best players from that scene for her song. It is interesting how different parts of America have their own particular grooves and regional music styles: GoGo here, New Orleans has a special shuffle, Chicago has its own thing, etc. 

At about midnight, Harv, our excellent and quirky but uber cool tour manager offered to take us all to a special local bar where they do alcoholic milk shakes. It sounded intriguing so about half a dozen of us went. Someone orders a peanut butter, whisky and cream shake (yes really), someone an avocado, tequila and cream one and a few of us go for the espresso, hazelnut and hennesseys cognac drink. Well I have to say they were most delicious. Rich though with all the thick cream, but ooh yes! Then back to the tour bus, and late night hanging out and chatting till about 3 am before sleep. Next stop, Buffalo, New York.

The Howard Theatre
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Tour Blog Part 18 : Philadelphia, Glenside, Keswick Theatre.

The Keswick Theatre (home of the Pennsy Pops)

So yesterday we had a stop off in North Carolina from 10 am until midnight, so the driver could have his break and sleep. We had hotel rooms but the area did not have much going on except highways, a shopping mall and a cinema. It was good to have time to rest, clean up, have a shower, do emails, have a walk etc. 

We had all heard about the terrible events in Boston, and I have both family and friends there, some close to where it all happened. We saw the news on the hotel lobby TV and were shocked at the events. No one I know was caught up in the bombings, but I was worried as one friend is seriously into running and I thought he might have run the marathon. For a day or two they had to stay home, stay indoors and not go out. Very scary. I am glad it has now been resolved. My thoughts and good wishes go to anyone who has suffered as a result of the bombings.

After having a bath and clean up and catching up on emails (and Facebook!), I tried to write some music as it is definitely time for me to write and record a new instrumental jazz album and tour round the British jazz clubs. 'Double Talk' was my last studio solo album and that was made in 2007! I have some pieces written and some half written ideas that need completing. I have manuscript paper and a keyboard on my iPad so have enough to work some things out. 

I then spent some time reading up on the film director Harmonie Korine, and watching YouTube clips of his films and him being interviewed on the David Letterman show. This was because Steven, Adam and I were going to see 'Spring Breakers', the new Harmonie Korine film in the evening. His earlier films are seriously weird, but on Letterman he was really funny. After going to the mall where we found a Ruby Tuesday restaurant, we saw the film. I was pleasantly surprised. It is not in fact weird, but very stylish and beautifully shot. James Franco and the four lead actresses were all excellent. I am not sure what the film 'said', but generally Korine's films are not narratives. Amusingly, on one Letterman interview in 1997, Korine says that his films have a beginning, a middle and an end but not necessarily in that order! 

So back on the bus at midnight and off to Glenside, near Philadelphia. We arrive in the morning and it is a lovely theatre. Ian Bond, our excellent sound engineer said he did the sound in this same venue for King Crimson in 2008. I went for a coffee near the theatre and the man who served me says "Hey Theo". Fame at last, eh? Back at the venue the facilities were very good and the catering excellent. 

Various friends of the band came to the gig. My band mates from the 'Goldbug' project came along - guitarist Tim Motzer and bass player Barry Mehan. The drummer in the band, Eric Slick was gigging so couldn't make it. We took the opportunity for a photo shoot as our new album is nearly finished. The talented Dejha Ti came and took the various photos. Michelle Moog, daughter of Bob and friend of Adam and Marco came along as did drummer Mike Portnoy. He seems like a nice guy. In publicity photos he always looks mean and fierce, but came over as a lovely guy in real life. I think that is often the way though. I remember well meeting Robert Wyatt for the first time. In photos he always looks like some sort of Greek god - Zeus or Neptune, austere and disapproving with his long thick beard. Then I met him and he giggled a lot and smiled and chuckled constantly. Very different! 

So the gig felt great to me and very enjoyable. Slick, powerful, focused, good solos. All the things you want it to be. Marco was back for this gig and was fabulous as you would expect. When he plays the drums on these songs, he does not just play the parts, he completely inhabits them. He IS them. It is extraordinary. The crowd was great too and super enthusiastic. So ...job done. Next stop, Washington D.C.

The talented Dejha Ti with Theo
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Tour Blog Part 17 : Atlanta, Georgia

Varsity Playhouse

So after the Florida gig, there is a telephone call and some bad news. There follows much discussion and some other calls and emails. For family and private reasons, Chad is going to have to leave the tour, at least for the time being. He will do the next night's gig in Atlanta, then there is a night off and he will fly back to L.A. He will be back, but we are not sure when. To accommodate this, Marco is contacted immediately to see if he can come back until his rehearsals with Joe Satriani start. Very fortunately it turns out that he can. This is of course a huge relief as of course Marco knows this music inside out, was in the band from the beginning and recorded the album etc. Marco and Chad are good friends, so Marco is able to help out and return and the immediate crisis is resolved. Wow! Life. 

So we drive through the night from Florida to Atlanta, Georgia in the Deep South of the US of A. Not that I get to see much of Atlanta. As usual, I wake up in a small bunk on the tour bus in a parking lot. I look out of the bus window and see a brick wall. I put some shoes on and ask where the venue entrance is. So I go through a doorway in the brick wall into a theatre and down some stairs into a nondescript basement dressing room. Bit like Groundhog Day. At least when on tour in America I know what country I am in. When touring round mainland Europe and you do this, it is not uncommon to clamber off the bus and have no idea what country you are in.

The venue is nice, and backstage facilities pretty good. All decent venues have shower facilities backstage so I have a shower and breakfast and catch up on e mails etc. At 4.30 pm there is a good soundcheck, and then off to dinner with Guthrie for a rather tasty hot chicken sandwich with avocado and salad and fries. It is good to go for a brief wander. The area around the venue has a great record shop called Criminal Records and there are lots of cool vintage clothes shops too. The street has a kind of Haight Ashbury vibe and felt pretty hip. 

Before the gig went to a nearby coffee house where there were some curious slogans posted on the wall - like 'Tampons for Jesus'. Eh...?! Also a local magazine called 'Ponce News', and a flyer for a 'Grow your own Marijuana' talk with a picture of a smiling scientist in a white lab coat. Yeah, man... 

So the gig felt really good. I did have some monitoring problems as there was some loud interference in the radio frequency used for my in ear monitors. It was manageable though. Chad was superb and everyone played well. In my soprano sax solo on Raider 2, there is some cool rhythmic interaction with the keyboards and drums. After the solo, I look over at Chad and he looks up and gives me a smile. I think that meant he liked it, and that felt great. Sometimes the smallest looks, nods, eyebrow movements on stage between musicians can communicate so much. Approval from Chad Wackerman. Cool. Steven was fantastic and as usual was great talking to the audience. He seems so natural doing it - Informative, funny, interacting with hecklers, being spontaneous. It sounds so natural and that is hard to do. I know from fronting my own band. Sometimes I spend half a song thinking what I am going to say, then I say something completely different to what I intended because something or someone in the audience diverts my attention. Then it comes out all wrong and I talk gibberish. So I have a lot of respect for people who can chat to the audience in a relaxed manner in between songs. And from being in an audience myself, I know this can add a lot to a gig. After all, you have heard the music on CD or record before, but you haven't necessarily heard the artist talk, and certainly not to you on that specific evening. I think it is a unique and special part of seeing a favourite artist live. So nice one, Steve. And as I say, he can be very funny. 

Hung out a bit after the gig and nice to see and chat with Andre Cholmondeley from 'Project Object' again. He is friends with Adam and Marco and I had met him at various European festivals and gigs before. He is currently tour managing Greg Lake. Good guy and some interesting chat. He also informed me that the David Bowie exhibition at the Victoria and Albert museum in London, which I was planning on going to is sold out until August. Most annoying. 

Then back on the bus for the long drive to Philadelphia. In fact we are driving through the night, then from 10am until tomorrow midnight we are in a hotel somewhere while the driver has a break, then back on the bus at midnight to complete the drive to Philly. Steven suggests if possible we could go and see the new Harmonie Korine film 'Spring Breakers' which is on general release and is the director's first mainstream film. Sounds like a good plan to me. 'Harmonie Korine' is the name of one of Steven's songs that we play in the set. I believe the song is named after him just because it is a beautiful name, not because the lyrics have anything to do with him. I subsequently spend some time online checking out the weird world of Harmonie Korine.

Theo with Steven Wilson
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Tour Blog Part 16 : St Petersburg, Florida, not Russia

​So the first gig of the US tour was just outside Tampa, Florida. A black box type rock venue and the back stage facilities were not great to be honest, and there was no rider. Not the best start. There were some technical problems and it was not possible to put up the gauze for the front and back projections which are important eg for 'Index' and 'The Watchmaker', so we were to do the gig without this. Incidentally Steven posted today on YouTube the live video of the band playing 'the Watchmaker' live in Germany from the recent Neu-Isenberg gig (see below). I think it looks and sounds pretty good. 

Before the gig I went to eat at a Thai place near the venue with Guthrie and Chad and had a good chat. Some more great stories from Chad about touring with James Taylor (the American 'Sweet Baby James' one not the English acid jazz one) which sounds amazing and extraordinary. Also heard some good Zappa stories, like when you auditioned for his band, he would say 'Do something fantastic for me'. This could be musical, technical, theatrical or off the wall and if he liked it and you were 'in' he would compose something to incorporate your special fantastic thing into the music for the band. 

It was Chad's first gig with the band so I think he was a little apprehensive as there is an enormous amount to remember, even with reminder notes. Well, he was extraordinary. Absolutely superb. Hats off to him. I was very impressed and loved what he did. 

The crowd went wild and that was very encouraging and positive. Especially as it was hot onstage and there had been some problems. I got a surprise during my alto flute improv' on the acoustic section of Raider 2, when I felt drops of water landing on my shoulder. Very off putting. It happened again in 'the Raven' and 'Radioactive Toy', though then it was dripping on my head. I looked up but could not see anything, so maybe it was leaking air conditioning or something. Anyway, these things happen and you can't let them put you off. The cheers at the end of the gig were amazing. We all got a nice surprise when during the band introductions we saw on the screen that a sketch by Hajo of Chad had been done to accompany his introduction and bow. Lovely touch.

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Tour Blog Part 15 : Tampa, Florida

Chad Wackerman

​So we have had a 2 week break between the European tour and the American and South American tour which continues for the next 5 weeks. The time off was great and has been busy: a recording session with Dave Sturt for the next Jade Warrior album; sorting out US Visas; a lovely trip to rural Suffolk; a day in central London for a Man Ray photo exhibition and an Alan Bennett play (Untold stories). The day turned out to be international Ben & Jerry's cone day - a day every year when the company thanks all its customers by having its ice cream parlours give out free Ben & Jerry's ice cream all day! Amazing, and very delicious. I also went to the cinema to see 'A late quartet' (loved it), and had various friends and neighbours round for drinks and catching up. Then, as always, lots of general 'stuff' to sort.... 

So we are now all in Tampa, Florida where we start touring around North America (coast to coast) then Mexico, Chile, Argentina, and probably Brazil. We arrived yesterday after an excellent flight that was 80% empty! So I could lie down on a row of 3 empty seats. Most pleasing and comfortable. Woke up for the day at 2.30am thanks to jet lag, and later, after breakfast went for a walk. The hotel is somewhere near the Bay, so I thought I would see if I could find the beach or at least water. Having crossed the main highway, I saw what appeared to be a large family of small white flamingos with duckbill beaks. It was most bizarre as it was in a residential street. I carried on walking and about 10 mins later saw at the side of the road and looking rather forlorn a small animal that I believe was a possum. I guess that was why it was barely moving. I saw a large and beautiful heron too. Porcupine Tree guitarist Wes came by later and he explained about all the wildlife in Florida. Worryingly he told us about all the wild alligators that can be found in the street, in gardens or wandering about - even climbing fences. They travel through the sewers and have been known to attack cats and dogs. Argh! 

Later we went to the rehearsal room and met our new drummer - Chad Wackerman- who is doing this whole part of the tour as Marco is touring with guitarist Joe Satriani in May. We had a grand total of 5 hours for Chad to rehearse the whole set. Not easy as this is very detailed and complicated music. He was incredible and played the entire set first time without making a mistake. He has a different sound to Marco and plays like Chad not like Marco but that is to be expected. Like Marco, he is one of the great drummers of the world and a lovely guy too. There were small stylistic things that were pointed out, and a few key fills that Steven wanted him to play, but these are not major and really just the icing on the cake. He did amazingly well and the gigs are going to be great. Afterwards we all went to the Cheesecake Factory with Wes for dinner. Chad told some amazing stories, eg how he played with Spinal Tap on four hours notice when they had some huge gig in LA and their regular drummer, Rick Parnell, broke his ankle just before soundcheck! Rick is brother of Marc Parnell, my good friend who is another wonderful drummer and who I have played and toured with for over 15 years. After some good food and chat we returned to the hotel for sleep. Looking forward to the gig tomorrow.

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Tour Blog Part 14 : Munich - Zurich

Photo by Diana Nitschke

​Last couple of days have been a bit of a blur, because of a head cold and taking every opportunity to rest more. Although I was not too terrible really, being ill when on the road is not much fun because you are almost always on the go. I seem to be on the mend now, which is good because after tonight's show in Milan, we have an 18 hour drive back to London. 

The gig in Munich was a good one and Marco's parents came along again to this one. My strongest memories of the gig are watching Marco's mum dancing away in the front row like a teenager. I think she is about 75, but she has some cool moves and was grooving way with the kids! 

Post gig bus films were two I had seen before - Scum and Still Crazy. Scum is very good but very gruesome. Hard hitting stuff with a young Ray Winstone and Phil Daniels again. Still Crazy is a bit lighter and good fun about a rock band that gets back together and goes on the road to see if they can still do it. Quite amusing. 

Zurich was a lovely theatre venue. It was a standing audience and they loved it. It is noticeable the difference in audience response when they are standing. Very animated, vocal and shouting and cheering. A difficult gig for me, but a very good gig overall I think. Then the Sherlock club convened for one final time on the European tour for the final episode. Adrian, Adam and I have been watching the BBC Benedict Cumberbatch Sherlock series, 6 episodes in all. I saw them all on TV, but they are so good it was great to see them again. Adam had not seen them before but knows all the original books very well and also the Jeremy Brett TV adaptations. Most excellent and what a cliffhanger at the end! 

And so here we are backstage in Milan. Seems like a massive warehouse type of a place in the middle of nowhere. The rain is beating down on the roof. Last gig of the European leg of the tour. Had some Tortelloni, a nice cuppa tea, a shower, am listening to Spirit of Eden by Talk Talk and feeling a bit human again. Should be good tonight.

View from the stage at Milan
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Tour Blog Part 13 : Stuttgart

Backstage

​The tour bus was scheduled to roll out of Frankfurt at 3 am to drive to Stuttgart, so there was plenty of time after the gig to hang out backstage. I was sitting with Adam and Guthrie and we got onto the subject of Alan Holdsworth, guitarist extraordinaire. I have not met him, but heard innumerable stories about him from the other guys in Soft Machine Legacy who all recorded and toured with him for ages. I introduced both Adam and Guthrie to Alan's amazing solo on Hazard Profile on Soft Machine 'Bundles' which blew them away. Adam also played Proto-cosmos from Tony Williams' 'Believe it'. The thing I love about those solos on Bundles is there is still a gritty earthiness to them. Alan played a Gibson SG guitar then and he 'digs in' with the rhythm section playing very rhythmic phrases that the band latches on to. Later on he became more ethereal and his glistening solos would float high above the rest of any band he played with. Great too - always incredible playing, but to me less connected to the other musicians than on those early to mid 1970s recordings. 

We then had an interesting discussion about great drummers and the difference between drummers with a metric and square approach to time and those with a more circular approach. Subdivision versus alchemy, elasticity versus tight precision and how both approaches work differently in a band context when you are trying to play with them. And between Guthrie, Adam and me we have worked with Marco, Chad Wackerman, Vinnie Colaiuta, Steve Gadd, John Marshall - some serious drummers! 

We arrived in Stuttgart for our day off and proceeded to have a 2 hour VISA 'party' with a bunch of us going through the long and complicated online questionnaire together that has to be completed prior to the interview at the US Embassy. Dull but necessary. Fingers crossed I got it right. 

Then chilled in my room and finished reading 'Neverwhere' accompanied by Brian Eno's 'On Land' - one of my favourite albums of all time (yes, really). Great book. I then popped out to get a bite to eat. On the way back I found a stall that sold 'Berliners'. Now famously JFK made a speech in 1963 in which he said 'Ich bin ein Berliner' meaning 'I am a Berliner', trying to show solidarity with the West German people but in fact it meant 'I am a jam doughnut', as a Berliner is indeed a special doughnut (donut if you are American), very soft, round and filled with a strawberry sauce in the middle. Well here it was, and I felt a moral and historical duty to try out this delicacy. It was indeed most delicious. 

Went to sleep - no snow. Woke up the next day, snow everywhere. Just as we thought we were done with it. And it is nearly April. The gig was in a venue we played at last year. Good sound. Full house. I felt rested after a day off. I always particularly enjoy the first few notes of soundcheck after a day off. It feels like 'yes - here we go...' The gig itself went well though there were a couple of technical glitches behind the scenes. Probably nothing that would have been noticed though. Great response by the crowd. I subsequently heard that more UK autumn dates have been announced and posted, including Bristol (15 oct) Wolverhampton (17 oct) Newcastle (18 oct) and the Royal Albert Hall, London (20 oct) That is going to be really special. 

After the gig, the film on the bus was Quadrophenia. Absolutely love it. Love the original album by the Who, love the film. Something important was pointed out to me at the very beginning of the film that I had not seen before. Tonto our excellent guitar technician is a proper mod. Scooter with all the mirrors, trips to Brighton on the bank holidays, has the gear, knows the people and the places. It was great to hear his inside knowledge as I watched the film again. Then I seemed to stay up rather later just chatting on the bus before retiring to bed at 3.30 am.

Nick Beggs. Marco Minneman, Theo, Steven Wilson, Adam Holtzman & Guthrie Govan
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Tour Blog Part 12 : Frankfurt

Steven and Theo 'exploring the space' during Raider II

Enter your text here ...Woke up on the bus in Frankfurt feeling a bit rough. Oh dear. Not good at all. With a bit of extra rest, an Aspirin, a walk to get some fresh air and a shower I felt much better and all was fine in time for the soundcheck. Phew. There was a bit of extra pressure on this gig as Steven had decided to film it with a full film crew, not for anything in particular and certainly no plans for a DVD to be released so soon after the last one, but just to have 'in the can'. So we needed to get it right and also soundcheck a bit longer just to make sure that the recording equipment was all functioning 100%.

Anyway, some interesting things happened on the gig. First of all, I have found hearing myself in the monitors quite difficult for my sax solo in 'No Part of Me'. It is during the loud part at the end of the song and there are heavy guitar riffs and the drums go crazy. So although I need to hear myself more, instead of turning me up, we tried turning my whole monitor mix of everything down and hey presto, much better. I could I hear everything more clearly and when we played that song tonight (one of my personal favourites), it felt better than it had done in a while.

Another curious thing occurred to me, which is that with all the very complicated music this band plays with changing time signatures and tricky melodic lines and the big solos I play, the part of the set which I am most nervous about is none of the above but in fact those exposed fragile clarinet notes at the very beginning of Raider 2. Very simple music really, but very exposed, surrounded by silence, and I am, to be honest, less of a clarinet player than a sax player and flautist.

The soprano sax solo in Raider 2 went fine and during it Steven came over, stood right in front of me and started pointing at the ceiling and around the room with a sort of 'explore the space' kind of gesture. Now I did not mind this at all and in fact looked him in the eye and started improvising following his gestures a little. He smiled back and it took the solo somewhere new and fresh. Then it occurred to me that maybe that is the difference between an improviser and a soloist. The soloist will often have their solo ideas largely prepared, a vocabulary of their 'licks' and favourite patterns and deliver them in a musical way that creates the finished product of 'the solo'. The improviser on the other hand is always open to immediate stimuli and will respond to whatever is going on around them - more like a boxer who has to be 100% alert at all times and change direction on a fraction of a moment's notice. I think that I, like many, am a combination of both but it is interesting how different musicians will clearly tend towards one or other approach and respond in different ways when a curve ball is thrown while they are soloing.

Some amusing heckles and shouts tonight by the audience I think Steven responded well and appropriately too. That is quite an art being able to deal with all that stuff on the fly and in the moment and doing it well.

Incidentally, there was a guest of one member of the band who came to a gig a few days ago but who had not seen him for several years. When he asked what they thought of the gig, they responded in luke warm terms. Not 'it was great', not ' I really appreciate the amazing playing and music', not even 'it is not my thing but it was well done '. More just '.....meh' and a nonchalant shrug of the shoulders. The musician concerned was taken aback and most unimpressed. We all thought this was v. poor and rude - especially with having had a guest ticket. So '....meh' has become a regular band comment and response - applicable in all situations! What was dinner like '....meh' etc. So while hanging around in the dressing room before the gig today I wrote and recorded this little ditty, with extra production input by Guthrie...the 'Meh song'.


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Tour Blog Part 11 : Berlin - Essen

Huxley's, Berlin

So after a day off in snowy Berlin during which the snow did not stop, half a dozen of us including Steven went for a very pleasant Greek meal and then relaxed in the hotel bar where a live duo was playing a mixture of classic songs and instrumental jazz. The lady drummer/singer who was American walked over to us and said 'You are clearly musicians!' and she seemed most interested in the band and wrote everything down so she could check out the new album later. 

The gig itself was the following day and was in a big hall, where I believe Porcupine Tree have played before. I met fans who had come to the gig from Peru and Brazil! There was a relaxed vibe onstage and I thought it was a good gig. This band is so tight and so professional that the sort of musical disasters that often happen onstage in a band just don't seem to happen with this lot. 

Steven asked the audience whether they liked to sit or stand and in response got everyone to stand up for the songs Harmonie Korine and No Part of Me. In fact I don't think they sat down for the rest of the night. It certainly increased the audible excitement in the room. For the encore we played Radioactive Toy again which worked really well (I thought so anyway). After the gig I went out to the merchandise stall to sign some CDs and programmes etc. 

On the tour bus after the gig the film for the evening was 'the Business' a Danny Dyer film about South London criminals in the Costa del crime and Gibraltar. Not my regular sort of film but I liked it. It was funny and had strong characters. It reminded me of the Phil Daniels character in Quadrophenia and that is a film I love.Then we finished off the Sherlock episode Hound of the Baskervilles before bed. Woke up in Essen. Hey no snow! 

The Essen venue was a huge theatre called the Colosseum. Plush red velvet seats and a massive upper tier too. It was full for the gig and I got that distinct feeling that this band is so good it is ready to take on the world....and win! Very responsive crowd. I am still finding new musical areas to explore during the sax and flute solo sections eg the big soprano sax solo in Raider 2. It is great that these sections change so much every night, and that makes the music feel very much alive.

Colosseum, Essen
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Tour Blog Part 10 : Oslo - Copenhagen

Sentrum Scene

I have played in Oslo many times and always in the same square in the centre of town where there are two venues next to each other (I think run by the same management) called Sentrum Scene and Rockerfeller. Today was at the former where I last played in 2007 with David Sylvian. That Sylvian gig was particularly memorable as the wonderful trumpeter Arve Henriksen sat in on the gig, and came out for a drink afterwards too. Great player with a wonderful sound and very fresh approach to playing the trumpet. 

There was some free time before the gig so I had contacted my friend the singer Anja Garbarek to see if she was free to meet up for a drink. I met Anja in 2001 when Steven Wilson was producing her album 'Smiling and Waving'. Despite her dad being Jan..., she wanted someone else to play flute and sax on the album and Steve brought me in. I was then in her live band and we toured around Europe for a while. It was a really wonderful band and a great experience. Steve Jansen on drums, Dudley Philips on bass, Sue Balingall on additional vocals and guitar amongst others. Everyone got on particularly well and it was very special music. I digress. So Anja was free and we met up for a drink which was great, as she is lovely and I rarely see her. I fear the glass or two of champagne may have adverse affected my performance though as I missed a couple of simple things which I should not have done. 

The sartorially elegant Nick Beggs changed his stage outfit again for the show - from his original dandy highwayman Count von prog, to yer regular rock bass man to the one and only 'Fu Chinn' . Good to see him back say I. Nick's outfits are great. Gig was good and some very appreciative fans. A noticeably younger audience than usual and also a definite higher percentage of males than females for this one. Although progressive rock is well known to be generally more followed by blokes than women, Steven's gigs always have lots of women there. Maybe because his music is not 'traditional' progressive rock, has some short songs, has more thoughtful lyrics than many, or maybe because women think he (and maybe others in the band??) is cute. Dunno. Maybe some women can say why they like SW but not King Crimson, Yes or Gentle Giant... Or maybe I have got it all wrong!

It was a late concert and afterwards we got on the bus to drive through the night to Copenhagen. Woke up feeling a bit rough. Not sure why, but definitely not so good. I had arranged to meet another music friend who I had not seen for years, the Danish trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg, who has made lots of ECM albums and famously composed and arranged an award winning album with Miles Davis called Aura. Palle came to London in 2001 to record on my CD 'Heart of the Sun'. It was all a wonderful experience and his contributions are stunning. We have been in touch since but only usually when I have visited Copenhagen on tour. We had time to catch up and grab a coffee and he heard the band too. Really fantastic to see him - a kind, gentle and thoughtful man. We both agreed it would be great if one day we can do something together again. 

The gig was at a grand theatre called VEGA and it was full and enjoyable. Jonas Reingold from the Tangent was my guest and he seemed to like it which was cool. I have not seen him for a few years now but was recording my parts for the new Tangent album listening to his bass parts very recently. Gavin Harrison is on drums on the album and Jonas and Gavin make a formidable rhythm section. 

After the gig more Sherlock on the tour bus and off in the snow to Berlin for a day off and a hotel. Nice.

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Tour Blog Part 9 : Stockholm

Filadelfiakyrkan Rörstrand - Filadelfia Stockholm

The venue in Stockholm was one of the most striking so far. A large church with a very wide stage and a dress circle and top balcony. At the back of the stage were pipes from the organ and in huge letters the word JESUS. The dressing room facilities were lavish with candelabras, comfortable sofas and very ornate fire places. The lift had buttons for floors 1 and a half and 5 and a half too (remember the films Being John Malkovich, and Harry Potter too?)! Not sure what was on those floors, and curiously if you pressed button 5 and a half the lift would not go there. 

The sound was surprisingly good in the room and the audience was pleasingly responsive. 

During the song 'Harmonie Korine' I leave the stage as I do not play on it. Sometimes I watch the video projected on the backdrop as it is great - very strange, evocative and powerful with weird imagery. So I noticed while this was on, I was standing next to a ten foot high wooden cross which seemed to accentuate the symbolism and imagery. "Whoa...talking of what I do during the gig, a few people have asked me what I am doing when I go up to the front of the stage and sit by the keyboard on the song 'the Raven..' Facebook, e mail, computer stuff.? No - I play the extra top line piano part, as Adam is already playing the main piano part which takes two hands. On the last tour I played about three songs on keys, but this tour just the one. I enjoy it. 

After the show and the traditional 'white Russian' drink at the end of the gig, we chilled for a bit then got on the bus as we were heading off to Oslo that night. Had a really interesting chat with our excellent tour manager Harv about his time touring with U2 during the Zooropa tour in the early nineties - a tour I actually saw at Wembley Stadium in London. Interesting to hear from someone what it is like on the inside and at the centre of a tour by such a huge band. Watched the film 'My cousin Vinnie' on the bus then to sleep. 

I woke up in Oslo where we got off the bus at 10 am and checked into our hotel. The snow was deeper here and the temperature lower. As I got to my room, I felt really exhausted and crashed out, not waking till lunchtime. Then I had a shower and started my book - 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman. So far...it is goooood. No gig tonight, so off for a meal with some of the chaps. Looking forward to the Oslo gig tomorrow and catching up with an old friend too.

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Tour Blog Part 8 : Hamburg

Still lots of snow when we reached Hamburg. As we had a day off, we stayed in a hotel - a smart one actually right next to the venue which is very handy. The venue in Hamburg was CCH Saal 2 and it was huge. A large concert hall that looked like it was usually for orchestras or choirs or maybe one of those great German radio bands like the NDR band. As there was the day off beforethe gig I thought I would use my time fruitfully by reading a book. 'The man in the high castle' by Philip K Dick was floating round the bus and it is said to be a classic so I thought I would give that a go. Managed to finish it over a couple of days. A kind of alternate reality book, not really science fiction, but very imaginative. Dick wrote the story that became the Bladerunner film amongst other things and is an iconic author who I have not read before. I enjoyed the book and it was interesting, but not quite my thing. Will probably try 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman next which I brought with me.

Anyway, the gig was seated and as I say in a huge room. These things did not help the vibe, though the sound was good. I think we played well but there was not much of a buzzy atmosphere. Marco's parents came to the gig and they are lovely and were in good spirits. I met some musician friends of Adam's too who were cool. They all enjoyed the gig a lot. After the gig had a nice hang with Guthrie and Marco in the hotel bar and had a good chat with them accompanied by a modest amount of Oban single malt whiskey. Strong stuff. I know the town of Oban quite well having played there once (Corran halls), stayed there a few times and taken the ferry to the island of Mull many times. Then sleep, before our long drive to Stockholm that was going to involve a short ferry ride, a very long tunnel and the huge Malmo bridge taking us to Sweden.

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